Mission: Founded over 30 years ago on the simple premise that all human beings have unsurpassable worth, City Relief is a mobile, faith-friendly, front-line responder and accredited NYC HRA provider whose mission is to consistently and compassionately offer hope, innovative care and services that ultimately lead to life transformation for NYC Metro area individuals struggling with homelessness and economic insecurity.

Our innovative mobile "pop-up" models use repeated and targeted outreach to effectively provide emergency food relief, masks, socks, hygiene items and access to care in a community-based setting that promotes dignity, comfort, and trust. This also allows us to offer integrated case management and referral services to our outreach guests both onsite and virtually, helping them to successfully navigate and overcome barriers to gaining housing, healthcare access, legal services, employment, and economic independence, SNAP benefits, and other services.

City Relief (formerly New York City Relief) is a 501(c)(3) organization, with an IRS ruling year of 1994, and donations are tax-deductible.

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Contact Information

  http://cityrelief.org/

 295 Walnut Street
Elizabeth NJ 07201 

  800-736-2773


You are viewing this organization's new Charity Navigator profile page. To view the legacy version, click here.

Star Rating System by Charity Navigator


Charity Navigator evaluates a nonprofit organization’s financial health including measures of stability, efficiency and sustainability. We also track accountability and transparency policies to ensure the good governance and integrity of the organization.




Good

This charity's score is 85.51, earning it a 3-Star rating. Donors can "Give with Confidence" to this charity. 

This score is calculated from two sub-scores:

This score represents Form 990 data from 2020, the latest year published by the IRS.

View this organization’s historical ratings.


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Star Rated Report

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Program Expense

Program Expense Ratio

74.6%


The Program Expense Ratio is determined by Program Expenses divided by Total Expense (average of most recent three 990s).


This measure reflects the percent of its total expenses a charity spends on the programs and services it exists to deliver. Dividing a charity's average program expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Administrative Expenses

12.9%


As reported by charities on their IRS Form 990, this measure reflects what percent of its total budget a charity spends on overhead, administrative staff and associated costs, and organizational meetings. Dividing a charity's average administrative expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Fundraising Expenses

12.3%


This measure reflects what a charity spends to raise money. Fundraising expenses can include campaign printing, publicity, mailing, and staffing and costs incurred in soliciting donations, memberships, and grants. Dividing a charity's average fundraising expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Liabilities to Assets Ratio

31.5%


The Liabilities to Assets Ratio is determined by Total Liabilities divided by Total Assets (most recent 990).


Part of our goal in rating the financial performance of charities is to help donors assess the financial capacity and sustainability of a charity. As do organizations in other sectors, charities must be mindful of their management of total liabilites in relation to their total assets. This ratio is an indicator of an organization’s solvency and or long term sustainability. Dividing a charity's total liabilities by its total assets yields this percentage.


Source: IRS Form 990

Fundraising Efficiency

$0.11


The amount spent to raise $1 in charitable contributions. To calculate a charity's fundraising efficiency, we divide its average fundraising expenses by the average total contributions it receives. We calculate the charity's average expenses and average contributions over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Working Capital Ratio

0.19 years


Determines how long a charity could sustain its level of spending using its net available assets, or working capital, as reported on its most recently filed Form 990. We include in a charity's working capital unrestricted and temporarily restricted net assets, and exclude permanently restricted net assets. Dividing these net available assets in the most recent year by a charity's average total expenses, yields the working capital ratio. We calculate the charity's average total expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Program Expense Growth

30.28%


We compute the average annual growth of program expenses using the following formula: [(Yn/Y0)(1/n)]-1, where Y0 is a charity's program expenses in the first year of the interval analyzed, Yn is the charity's program expenses in the most recent year, and n is the interval of years passed between Y0 and Yn.


Source: IRS Form 990

Governance


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990 that the organization has these governance practices in place.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990

Governance:
Independent Voting Board Members  ... (More)
No Material Diversion of Assets ... (More)

A diversion of assets – any unauthorized conversion or use of the organization's assets other than for the organization's authorized purposes, including but not limited to embezzlement or theft – can seriously call into question a charity's financial integrity. We check the charity's last two Forms 990 to see if the charity has reported any diversion of assets. If the charity does report a diversion, then we check to see if it complied with the Form 990 instructions by describing what happened and its corrective action. This metric will be assigned to one of the following categories:

  • Full Credit: There has been no diversion of assets within the last two years.

  • Partial Credit: There has been a diversion of assets within the last two years and the charity has used Schedule O on the Form 990 to explain: the nature of the diversion, the amount of money or property involved and the corrective action taken to address the matter. In this situation, we deduct 7 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
  • No Credit: There has been a diversion of assets within the last two years and the charity's explanation on Schedule O is either non-existent or not sufficient. In this case, we deduct 15 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
(Less)
Audited Financials Prepared by Independent Accountant ... (More)

Audited financial statements provide important information about financial accountability and accuracy. They should be prepared by an independent accountant with oversight from an audit committee. (It is not necessary that the audit committee be a separate committee. Often at smaller charities, it falls within the responsibilities of the finance committee or the executive committee.) The committee provides an important oversight layer between the management of the organization, which is responsible for the financial information reported, and the independent accountant, who reviews the financials and issues an opinion based on its findings. We check the charity's Form 990 reporting to see if it meets this criteria.

  • Full Credit: The charity's audited financials were prepared by an independent accountant with an audit oversight committee.

  • Partial Credit: The charity's audited financials were prepared by an independent accountant, but it did not have an audit oversight committee. In this case, we deduct 7 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
  • No Credit: The charity did not have its audited financials prepared by an independent accountant. In this case, we deduct 15 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
(Less)
Does Not Provide Loan(s) to or Receive Loan(s) From Related Parties ... (More)
Documents Board Meeting Minutes ... (More)
Distributes 990 to Board Before Filing ... (More)
Compensates Board ... (More)

Policies


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990, or for some metrics on the charity's website, that the organization has these policies in place.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990 and organization's website

Policies:
Conflict of Interest  ... (More)
Whistleblower ... (More)
Records Retention and Destruction ... (More)
CEO Compensation Process ... (More)
Donor Privacy ... (More)

Donors have expressed extreme concern about the use of their personal information by charities and the desire to have this information kept confidential. The exchanging and sale of lists for telemarketing and the mass distribution of "junk mail," among other things, can be minimized if the charity assures the privacy of its donors. Privacy policies are assigned to one of the following categories:

  • Yes: This charity has a written donor privacy policy published on its website, which states unambiguously that (1) it will not share or sell a donor's personal information with anyone else, nor send donor mailings on behalf of other organizations or (2) it will only share or sell personal information once the donor has given the charity specific permission to do so.

  • Opt-out: The charity has a written privacy policy published on its website which enables donors to tell the charity to remove their names and contact information from lists the charity shares or sells. How a donor can have themselves removed from a list differs from one charity to the next, but any and all opt-out policies require donors to take specific action to protect their privacy.
  • No: This charity either does not have a written donor privacy policy in place to protect their contributors' personal information, or the existing policy does not meet our criteria.

The privacy policy must be specific to donor information. A general website policy which references "visitor" or "user" personal information will not suffice. A policy that refers to donor information collected on the website is also not sufficient as the policy must be comprehensive and applicable to both online and offline donors. The existence of a privacy policy of any type does not prohibit the charity itself from contacting the donor for informational, educational, or solicitation purposes.

(Less)

Transparency


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990, or for some metrics on the charity's website, that the organization makes this information easily accessible.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990 and organization's website

Transparency:
CEO Salary Listed on 990 ... (More)
Board of Directors Listed on Website ... (More)
Key Staff Listed on Website ... (More)
Audited Financial Statements on Website ... (More)
Form 990 Available on Website ... (More)

Additional Information

Unscored

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Total Revenue and Expenses

Total Revenue and Expenses

This chart displays the trend of revenue and expenses over the past several years for this organization, as reported on their IRS Form 990.

Salary of Key Persons

Presented here are this organizations key compensated staff members as identified by our analysts. This compensation data includes salary, cash bonuses and expense accounts and is displayed exactly how it is reported to the IRS. The amounts do not include nontaxable benefits, deferred compensation, or other amounts not reported on W-2. In some cases, these amounts may include compensation from related organizations. Read the IRS policies for compensation reporting



Juan Galloway, President & CEO

$92,677 (1.65% of Total Expenses)


Source: IRS Form 990 (page 7), filing year 2020

Business Master File Data

Below are some key data points from the Exempt Organization IRS Business Master File (BMF) for this organization. Learn more about the BMF on the IRS website


Activities:

Missionary activities (BMF activity code: 006)


Foundation Status:

Organization which receives a substantial part of its support from a governmental unit or the general public   170(b)(1)(A)(vi) (BMF foundation code: 15)


Affiliation:

Independent - the organization is an independent organization or an independent auxiliary (i.e., not affiliated with a National, Regional, or Geographic grouping of organizations). (BMF affiliation code: 3)

Data Sources: IRS Forms 990

The Form 990 is a document that nonprofit organizations file with the IRS annually. We leverage finance and accountability data from it to form Encompass ratings. Click here to view this organization's Forms 990 on the IRS website (if any are available).

Pandemic Response

Due to the unprecedented nature of the pandemic, we give charities such as this one the opportunity to share the story of COVID's impact on them. Charities may submit their own pandemic responses through their nonprofit portal.


City Relief (formerly New York City Relief) reported being impacted by COVID-19 in the following ways:
  • Program Delivery

  • Fundraising Capacity

  • Administrative Capacity


How COVID-19 impacted the organization's operations financially:

New York City Relief's, DBA City Relief, concern for public health and safety led us to cancel our annual gala event scheduled for May 4, 2020, which was our only major public event of the year and carried a $500,000 fundraising goal. City Relief has also been unable to host our usual weekly out-of-state volunteer teams to serve some of the poorest neighborhoods in America and taking home tools, models and experiences to share with others. These volunteer teams pay fees for lodging, meals and other trip costs; cancellation of advance bookings results in lost revenue for City Relief. City Relief is happy to report that we also experienced extensive generosity through individuals and other organizations. Foundations like The Robin Hood Foundation, New York Community Trust, Hope for New York and others offered COVID-19 Relief grants to which we applied and also were granted. These were pivotal for us continuing our much needed services throughout New York City and New Jersey.


How COVID-19 impacted the organization's delivery of programs:

City Relief initially saw a sharp increase in the demand for our meals and services at the onset of the crisis resulting in us serving over double the number of individuals in half the time. City Relief continues to serve 40% more individuals compared to prior to the pandemic. There also continues to be increased costs to maintain health and safety standards by procuring extra cleaning and sanitation supplies and personal protective equipment for our staff, outreach guests and volunteers. City Relief maintained our eight weekly outreaches without interruption during the pandemic. Individuals struggling with homelessness and economic insecurity, who also have concurrent health risks, need much more help, delivered in ways that directly meet their escalating needs. This is why City Relief's work was and remains critical to maintain in the face of this ongoing pandemic, as our mobile, flexible model can easily adapt to the needs of those we serve despite extreme circumstances.


How this organization adapted to changing conditions caused by COVID-19:

City Relief adapted our services in various ways including: - Pre-packaging to-go meals with soup, bread, snacks to distribute to guests at the outreach - Setting up a line with 6 feet of social distance between each person and adding hand washing stations through a partnership with Love Beyond Walls and Google. - Transitioning from face-to-face case management on the street to virtual connections between our Follow-up Care team. - Continuously updating information sheets with current available services such as showers, restrooms, shelter, medical care, etc. - Offering hotel stays for our guests who had no option to “shelter in place,” quarantine, recover from illness, seek protection from inclement weather, and more. In total, City Relief has supplied over 600 nights of hotel stays.


Innovations the organization intends to continue permanently after the pandemic:

During the pandemic, cell phones became a lifeline for guests to access various essential services now only available virtually. City Relief partnered with Doctors Without Borders initially to provide cell phones to our guests and later began supplying cell phones directly. We continue to supply up to 10 cell phones per week to guests who are not eligible to access a cell phone elsewhere. City Relief believes in the power of collaboration with other community service partners like the Ryan Health Medical Center Van and the Echelon Society to offer general medical care, mental health care, COVID-19 testing/vaccinations and other services directly at one or more of City Relief’s outreaches. City Relief continues to partner with a multitude of organizations to increase access to food, employment, housing, legal services, and much more in addition to health and mental services.


Historical Ratings

Date PublishedForm 990 FYEOverall ScoreOverall Rating
Rating Version: 2.1
8/3/20212020 85.51
2/1/20202018 85.05
2/1/20192017 82.12
6/1/20182016 90.74
5/1/20182016 89.50

This organization received multiple star ratings within this fiscal year, due to an update to it's Accountability and Transparency data and/or the receipt of an amended Form 990.

5/1/20172015 92.85
3/1/20172015 87.21
12/21/20162015 84.78
12/1/20162015 74.92
6/1/20162014 94.18
Rating Version: 2.0
4/1/20162014 92.41
11/1/20152014 89.50
6/1/20152013 85.67
3/1/20142012 85.59

...   Impact & Results


This score estimates the actual impact a nonprofit has on the lives of those it serves, and determines whether it is making good use of donor resources to achieve that impact.


Impact & Results Score

Not Currently Scored

City Relief (formerly New York City Relief) cannot currently be evaluated by our Encompass Rating Impact & Results methodology because either (A) it is eligible, but we have not yet received data; (B) we have not yet developed an algorithm to estimate its programmatic impact; (C) its programs are not direct services; or (D) it is not heavily reliant on contributions from individual donors.

Note: The absence of a score does not indicate a positive or negative assessment, it only indicates that we have not yet evaluated the organization.

Learn more about Impact & Results.

Do you work at City Relief (formerly New York City Relief)? Join the waitlist for an updated Impact & Results score.


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Additional Information

Unscored

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Largest Programs

Largest Programs



City Relief (formerly New York City Relief) reported its largest program on its FY 2020 Form 990 as:


$4,338,654

Spent in most recent FY

100%

Percent of program expenses


FEED, CLOTHE AND MINISTER TO THE DAILY NEEDS OF THE POOR AND HOMELESS.


...   Leadership & Adaptability


This score provides an assessment of the organization's leadership capacity, strategic thinking and planning, and ability to innovate or respond to changes in constituent demand/need or other relevant social and economic conditions to achieve the organization's mission.


Leadership & Adaptability Score

100

out of 100

The score earned by City Relief (formerly New York City Relief) is a passing score.

Encompass Rating V4 provides an evaluation of the organization's Leadership & Adaptability through the nonprofit organization submitting a survey response directly to Charity Navigator.


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Leadership & Adaptability Report

100

of 100 points

Mission

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking through articulating the organization’s mission


New York City Relief, Inc. DBA City Relief creates connections with the hurting and homeless to resources and hope.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Vision

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking through articulating the organization’s vision.


City Relief is creating a reality where every individual experiencing homelessness and economic insecurity in the NYC Metro area knows their value as a Child of God, has access to the resources they need to thrive physically, mentally, socially & spiritually and has hope for a better future.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Strategic Goals

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking and goal setting through sharing their most important strategic goals.


Goal One: Deepen existing program services in Newark, Paterson, and New York City (Volunteer Mobilization, Outreach, Follow-up including case management and referrals, & Community Partnerships).

Goal Type: Grow, expand, scale or increase access to the existing programs and services.


Goal Two: Expand marketing strategies while increasing efficiency in our processes and cross departmental communications with a new CRM to improve donor/volunteer engagement and increase revenue.

Goal Type: Invest in the capacity of our organization (financial, management, technical, etc.).


Goal Three: Strengthen and expand collaborations with Community Partners and other Churches, Companies, Organizations, etc.

Goal Type: Focus on core programs to achieve mission and scale back on programs not seen as core.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Leadership Development

The nonprofit provides evidence of investment in leadership development


Describe an investment in leadership

Cultivating leaders is essential for nonprofits to continue to grow and adapt to the changing needs of their mission and of the nonprofit sector at large, as well as to be prepared to navigate new and difficult challenges, such as those introduced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to a generous grant, City Relief was able to offer strategic leadership development, including executive coaching for our CEO and a personal strengths assessment and training for City Relief’s executive team and its director level staff (13 staff members in total). Sessions were facilitated by Pete Cafarchio, an ICF-certified coach, consultant, and mentor, over a 12-month period.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Mobilizing for Mission

The nonprofit provides evidence of leadership through focusing externally and mobilizing resources for the mission.


This organization mobilizes for mission in the following ways:
  • Strategic Partnerships

  • Networks of Collective Impact Efforts

  • Thought Leadership

  • Raising Awareness

  • Community Building

What are this organization’s external mobilizaton efforts?

As a front-line provider, City Relief is cognizant of the unacceptable experiences of our guests as they navigate challenges to accessing services. Through our recent research-based survey, in partnership with New York University research Deborah Padgett, we are improving our programs to better address our guests’ needs and to advocate for positive change across the Continuum of Care (CoC). We regularly participate in CoC meetings and collaborative initiatives. These initiatives are targeted towards short and long-term solutions and advocacy for the NYC homeless community to provide successful pathways out of homelessness towards a healthy, productive, and sustainable future.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Story of Adaptability

The nonprofit has an opportunity to tell the story of how the organization adapted to tremendous external changes in the last year.


Hurricane Ida hit NJ on September 1st, delivering heavy rainfall throughout the state. In Elizabeth, NJ, where City Relief’s main base office (‘the Base’) is located, up to 10 inches of rain fell within about 12 hours. It was nearly more than double the rainfall anticipated by weather forecasters and occurred in around half of the time predicted. Hundreds of people in Elizabeth, NJ alone were displaced by the storm as the city was inundated by overflow from the Elizabeth River, which crested at eight to ten feet—levels that haven’t been seen in 50 years. The magnitude of flash flooding was completely unforeseen, unprecedented, and left City Relief’s office flooded with over 18 inches of standing water. Although City Relief’s base, which is also the headquarters of our outreach operations, was severely damaged, we have remained committed to conducting our outreach efforts without interruption. Our organization serves, on average, over 1,000 people per week, and we take that responsibility very seriously. As a result of Hurricane Ida, one of our industrial kettles was damaged in the flooding, which we typically use to make soup. In the immediate aftermath, our Outreach team bought pizza to distribute in place of soup. This, however, was not a financially feasible long-term option. We have been able to creatively use our other kettle for soup temporarily. However, the process has proven time consuming and logistically inefficient. We are looking into more sustainable alternatives until our kitchen is back in working order. While we are in the midst of building back stronger, we have not missed an outreach and adapted our outreach preparation and clean up to adjust to the current situation. We recently began welcoming our out-of-state volunteer teams, who typically lodge with us, after the onset of the pandemic and now have been creative to have them lodge elsewhere or reschedule their trips. With any crisis that comes our way, we continue to stay mission-focused.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

...   Culture & Community


This score provides an assessment of the organization's engagement with the constituents it serves, a practice we term Constituent Feedback. When organizations listen to constituents, they are able to better deliver on programs and meet the needs of stakeholders. A future version of this Beacon will also assess an organization's people operations and its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) metrics.


Culture & Community Score

Not Currently Scored

City Relief (formerly New York City Relief) is currently not eligible for a Culture & Community score because we have not received its Constituent Feedback data. Nonprofit organizations are encouraged to fill out the How We Listen section of their Candid profile. This data will provide the basis for the initial evaluation of Culture & Community.

Note: The absence of a score does not indicate a positive or negative assessment, it only indicates that we have not yet evaluated the organization.


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Culture & Community Report

Unscored

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Constituent Feedback

Constituent Feedback


Constituent Feedback and Listening Practice data are not available for this organization. Nonprofit organizations are encouraged to fill out the How We Listen section of their Candid profile. This data will provide the basis for the initial evaluation of Culture & Community.


Charity Navigator believes nonprofit organizations that engage in inclusive practices, such as collecting feedback from the people and communities they serve, may be more effective. We award every nonprofit that completes the Candid survey full credit for this Beacon, in recognition of their willingness to publicly share this information with the nonprofit and philanthropic communities. Although the data is not evaluated for quality at this time, future iterations of this Beacon will include third party or other data that will serve to validate the information provided by the nonprofit.

Analysis and Research


Like the overall Encompass Rating System, the Culture & Community Beacon is designed to evolve as metrics are developed and ready for integration. Our partnership with Feedback Labs and Guidestar by Candid, and other partners including Fund for Shared Insight, GlobalGiving, and Keystone Accountability, enables us to launch the first version of this beacon with Constituent Feedback information collected on Candid's site.


Feedback practices have been shown to support better Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion outcomes, an essential area of assessment that we intend to further expand and develop in the future. Feedback Labs has documented several studies which indicate that beyond achieving organizational goals, nonprofits that are attentive and responsive to concerns and ideas raised by beneficiaries establish stronger relationships with the people they serve, promote greater equity, and empower constituents in ways that can help to ensure better long-term outcomes. You can find resources to help nonprofits improve their feedback practices here.

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