Mission: Active Minds is the nation's premier nonprofit organization promoting mental health awareness and education for young adults.
We are dedicated to saving lives and to building stronger families and communities. Through education, research, advocacy, and a focus on young adults ages 14-25. Active Minds is opening up the conversation about mental health and creating lasting change in the way mental health is talked about, cared for, and valued. What has guided and distinguished us from the start is a belief that young people will be the drivers of change.
Active Minds is present in more than 800 schools, communities and workplaces nationwide, including 550 student-led chapters. Our programs and services empower young adults to reduce the stigma surrounding mental health, create communities of support, and ultimately save lives.
Nearly 15,000 volunteer leaders are changing their local culture around mental health, and reaching nearly 1.8 million people with Active Mind's programs.

Active Minds is a 501(c)(3) organization, with an IRS ruling year of 2004, and donations are tax-deductible.

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Contact Information

  https://www.activeminds.org/

  2001 S Street NW
Suite 630
Washington DC 20009 

  202-332-9595


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Star Rating System by Charity Navigator


Charity Navigator evaluates a nonprofit organization’s financial health including measures of stability, efficiency and sustainability. We also track accountability and transparency policies to ensure the good governance and integrity of the organization.




Exceptional

This charity's score is 91.49, earning it a 4-Star rating. Donors can "Give with Confidence" to this charity. 

This score is calculated from two sub-scores:

This score represents Form 990 data from 2019, the latest year published by the IRS.

View this organization’s historical ratings.


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Star Rated Report

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Program Expense

Program Expense Ratio

80.0%


The Program Expense Ratio is determined by Program Expenses divided by Total Expense (average of most recent three 990s).


This measure reflects the percent of its total expenses a charity spends on the programs and services it exists to deliver. Dividing a charity's average program expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Administrative Expenses

8.1%


As reported by charities on their IRS Form 990, this measure reflects what percent of its total budget a charity spends on overhead, administrative staff and associated costs, and organizational meetings. Dividing a charity's average administrative expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Fundraising Expenses

11.8%


This measure reflects what a charity spends to raise money. Fundraising expenses can include campaign printing, publicity, mailing, and staffing and costs incurred in soliciting donations, memberships, and grants. Dividing a charity's average fundraising expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Liabilities to Assets Ratio

5.5%


The Liabilities to Assets Ratio is determined by Total Liabilities divided by Total Assets (most recent 990).


Part of our goal in rating the financial performance of charities is to help donors assess the financial capacity and sustainability of a charity. As do organizations in other sectors, charities must be mindful of their management of total liabilites in relation to their total assets. This ratio is an indicator of an organization’s solvency and or long term sustainability. Dividing a charity's total liabilities by its total assets yields this percentage.


Source: IRS Form 990

Fundraising Efficiency

$0.10


The amount spent to raise $1 in charitable contributions. To calculate a charity's fundraising efficiency, we divide its average fundraising expenses by the average total contributions it receives. We calculate the charity's average expenses and average contributions over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Working Capital Ratio

1.32 years


Determines how long a charity could sustain its level of spending using its net available assets, or working capital, as reported on its most recently filed Form 990. We include in a charity's working capital unrestricted and temporarily restricted net assets, and exclude permanently restricted net assets. Dividing these net available assets in the most recent year by a charity's average total expenses, yields the working capital ratio. We calculate the charity's average total expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Program Expense Growth

4.09%


We compute the average annual growth of program expenses using the following formula: [(Yn/Y0)(1/n)]-1, where Y0 is a charity's program expenses in the first year of the interval analyzed, Yn is the charity's program expenses in the most recent year, and n is the interval of years passed between Y0 and Yn.


Source: IRS Form 990

Governance


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990 that the organization has these governance practices in place.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990

Governance:
Independent Voting Board Members  ... (More)
No Material Diversion of Assets ... (More)

A diversion of assets – any unauthorized conversion or use of the organization's assets other than for the organization's authorized purposes, including but not limited to embezzlement or theft – can seriously call into question a charity's financial integrity. We check the charity's last two Forms 990 to see if the charity has reported any diversion of assets. If the charity does report a diversion, then we check to see if it complied with the Form 990 instructions by describing what happened and its corrective action. This metric will be assigned to one of the following categories:

  • Full Credit: There has been no diversion of assets within the last two years.

  • Partial Credit: There has been a diversion of assets within the last two years and the charity has used Schedule O on the Form 990 to explain: the nature of the diversion, the amount of money or property involved and the corrective action taken to address the matter. In this situation, we deduct 7 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
  • No Credit: There has been a diversion of assets within the last two years and the charity's explanation on Schedule O is either non-existent or not sufficient. In this case, we deduct 15 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
(Less)
Audited Financials Prepared by Independent Accountant ... (More)

Audited financial statements provide important information about financial accountability and accuracy. They should be prepared by an independent accountant with oversight from an audit committee. (It is not necessary that the audit committee be a separate committee. Often at smaller charities, it falls within the responsibilities of the finance committee or the executive committee.) The committee provides an important oversight layer between the management of the organization, which is responsible for the financial information reported, and the independent accountant, who reviews the financials and issues an opinion based on its findings. We check the charity's Form 990 reporting to see if it meets this criteria.

  • Full Credit: The charity's audited financials were prepared by an independent accountant with an audit oversight committee.

  • Partial Credit: The charity's audited financials were prepared by an independent accountant, but it did not have an audit oversight committee. In this case, we deduct 7 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
  • No Credit: The charity did not have its audited financials prepared by an independent accountant. In this case, we deduct 15 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
(Less)
Does Not Provide Loan(s) to or Receive Loan(s) From Related Parties ... (More)
Documents Board Meeting Minutes ... (More)
Distributes 990 to Board Before Filing ... (More)
Compensates Board ... (More)

Policies


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990, or for some metrics on the charity's website, that the organization has these policies in place.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990 and organization's website

Policies:
Conflict of Interest  ... (More)
Whistleblower ... (More)
Records Retention and Destruction ... (More)
CEO Compensation Process ... (More)
Donor Privacy ... (More)

Donors have expressed extreme concern about the use of their personal information by charities and the desire to have this information kept confidential. The exchanging and sale of lists for telemarketing and the mass distribution of "junk mail," among other things, can be minimized if the charity assures the privacy of its donors. Privacy policies are assigned to one of the following categories:

  • Yes: This charity has a written donor privacy policy published on its website, which states unambiguously that (1) it will not share or sell a donor's personal information with anyone else, nor send donor mailings on behalf of other organizations or (2) it will only share or sell personal information once the donor has given the charity specific permission to do so.

  • Opt-out: The charity has a written privacy policy published on its website which enables donors to tell the charity to remove their names and contact information from lists the charity shares or sells. How a donor can have themselves removed from a list differs from one charity to the next, but any and all opt-out policies require donors to take specific action to protect their privacy.
  • No: This charity either does not have a written donor privacy policy in place to protect their contributors' personal information, or the existing policy does not meet our criteria.

The privacy policy must be specific to donor information. A general website policy which references "visitor" or "user" personal information will not suffice. A policy that refers to donor information collected on the website is also not sufficient as the policy must be comprehensive and applicable to both online and offline donors. The existence of a privacy policy of any type does not prohibit the charity itself from contacting the donor for informational, educational, or solicitation purposes.

(Less)

Transparency


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990, or for some metrics on the charity's website, that the organization makes this information easily accessible.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990 and organization's website

Transparency:
CEO Salary Listed on 990 ... (More)
Board of Directors Listed on Website ... (More)
Key Staff Listed on Website ... (More)
Audited Financial Statements on Website ... (More)
Form 990 Available on Website ... (More)

Additional Information

Unscored

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Total Revenue and Expenses

Total Revenue and Expenses

This chart displays the trend of revenue and expenses over the past several years for this organization, as reported on their IRS Form 990.

Salary of Key Persons

Presented here are this organizations key compensated staff members as identified by our analysts. This compensation data includes salary, cash bonuses and expense accounts and is displayed exactly how it is reported to the IRS. The amounts do not include nontaxable benefits, deferred compensation, or other amounts not reported on W-2. In some cases, these amounts may include compensation from related organizations. Read the IRS policies for compensation reporting



Alison Malmon, Founder, Executive Director

$148,430 (7.18% of Total Expenses)


Source: IRS Form 990 (page 7), filing year 2020

Business Master File Data

Below are some key data points from the Exempt Organization IRS Business Master File (BMF) for this organization. Learn more about the BMF on the IRS website


Activities:

Activity data not reported from the IRS


Foundation Status:

Organization which receives a substantial part of its support from a governmental unit or the general public   170(b)(1)(A)(vi) (BMF foundation code: 15)


Affiliation:

Independent - the organization is an independent organization or an independent auxiliary (i.e., not affiliated with a National, Regional, or Geographic grouping of organizations). (BMF affiliation code: 3)

Data Sources: IRS Forms 990

The Form 990 is a document that nonprofit organizations file with the IRS annually. We leverage finance and accountability data from it to form Encompass ratings. Click here to view this organization's Forms 990 on the IRS website (if any are available).

Pandemic Response

Due to the unprecedented nature of the pandemic, we give charities such as this one the opportunity to share the story of COVID's impact on them. Charities may submit their own pandemic responses through their nonprofit portal.


Active Minds reported being impacted by COVID-19 in the following ways:
  • Program Delivery

  • Fundraising Capacity

  • Revenue

  • Staffing

  • Administrative Capacity


How COVID-19 impacted the organization's operations financially:

Despite the strain, Active Minds was able to conclude the year financially secure and to use these resources to continue reaching millions with our vital mental health programs and our key message that ‘it’s okay to not be okay.’


How COVID-19 impacted the organization's delivery of programs:

We developed a new online version of our acclaimed Send Silence Packing exhibit, both as a stand-alone educational resource and as an enhancement of our in-person display. And after seeing incredible interest in virtual events from our Speakers (increasingly in workplaces, too), we effectively supported this digital pivot through content development, increasing production value, marketing, and speaker support. We held a virtual National Conference for the first time in our history, took first steps to pursue long-term goals of supporting young adults to advocate on local, state, and federal levels, and are developing a research-based curriculum for our chapters to increase the consistency and quality of their discussions across our network.


How this organization adapted to changing conditions caused by COVID-19:

Most notably, we expanded our support of students of color, who are disproportionately impacted by the pandemic and the heightened awareness of systemic racism, through trainings and support of our students to lead programs to reach students of color, webinars and blog posts that elevate the voices of students of color, and our innovative Your Voice is Your Power campaign. Our team is growing in exciting ways, including adding a new team to promote mental health in K-12 schools and a new Senior Manager of Health Equity, to help drive on programmatic goals within Active Minds’ Anti-Racism and Inclusion Plan. Through these innovations, Active Minds will continue to keep the country’s attention on the very important mental health culture changes underway.


Innovations the organization intends to continue permanently after the pandemic:

The Active Minds Inaugural Mental Health Advocacy Academy is the only leadership development and mental health advocacy academy that empowers Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) high school students to enact change in their schools, communities, and states. The Academy will prepare high school students for lifelong engagement on advocacy, grassroots organizing, and political engagement around mental health. The Mental Health Advocacy Academy is a unique, paid leadership program intended to ensure that high school students have tools and resources to develop mental health advocacy campaigns that will transform change in school, community, and state culture and increase mental health resources. Academy members will have the opportunity to develop a mental health campaign that contributes to the cutting-edge field of mental health policy advocacy.


Historical Ratings

Date PublishedForm 990 FYEOverall ScoreOverall Rating
Rating Version: 2.1
12/1/20202019 91.49
11/1/20202018 84.12

...   Impact & Results


This score estimates the actual impact a nonprofit has on the lives of those it serves, and determines whether it is making good use of donor resources to achieve that impact.


Impact & Results Score

Not Currently Scored

Active Minds cannot currently be evaluated by our Encompass Rating Impact & Results methodology because either (A) it is eligible, but we have not yet received data; (B) we have not yet developed an algorithm to estimate its programmatic impact; (C) its programs are not direct services; or (D) it is not heavily reliant on contributions from individual donors.

Note: The absence of a score does not indicate a positive or negative assessment, it only indicates that we have not yet evaluated the organization.

Learn more about Impact & Results.


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Additional Information

Unscored

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Largest Programs

Largest Programs



Active Minds reported its three largest programs on its FY 2020 Form 990 as:


$637,813

Spent in most recent FY

32%

Percent of program expenses


Chapter Development and Support:Active Minds is dedicated to promoting the young adult voice in mental health. In 2019-2020, the organization supported chapters on 589 college and high school campuses ... (More)


$428,000

Spent in most recent FY

21%

Percent of program expenses


Public Education and Awareness Campaigns:Active Minds has created Awareness Campaigns for our chapters, partners, and supporters such as V-A-R, Suicide Prevention Month, Stress Less Week, #HereForYou, ... (More)


$271,600

Spent in most recent FY

13%

Percent of program expenses


National Conference:The Active Minds National Conference is the leading conference in young adult mental health. The 2020 Conference in Washington, DC brought together 602 attendees from 18 states and ... (More)


...   Leadership & Adaptability


This score provides an assessment of the organization's leadership capacity, strategic thinking and planning, and ability to innovate or respond to changes in constituent demand/need or other relevant social and economic conditions to achieve the organization's mission.


Leadership & Adaptability Score

100

out of 100

The score earned by Active Minds is a passing score.

Encompass Rating V4 provides an evaluation of the organization's Leadership & Adaptability through the nonprofit organization submitting a survey response directly to Charity Navigator.


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Leadership & Adaptability Report

100

of 100 points

Mission

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking through articulating the organization’s mission


Active Minds is the nation’s leading nonprofit organization supporting mental health awareness and education for young adults. Powered by a network on more than 800 high school and college campuses, in workplaces and communities, and through a vast public audience, Active Minds is creating communities of support and saving lives. Our signature programs include a robust college and high school chapter program, the nationally acclaimed Send Silence Packing® exhibit, our compelling Active Minds Speakers, and the newly launched Active Minds @Work initiative.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Vision

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking through articulating the organization’s vision.


Active Minds is recognized as the leading nonprofit organization changing the culture around mental health in society. We believe proactive, preventative mental health care is embedded in all facets of society - where we live, study, work, and play. We aim to change the culture of mental health in society through conversation, innovation, policy, equity, and social norms.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Strategic Goals

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking and goal setting through sharing their most important strategic goals.


Goal One: Our first programmatic goal is to establish and fully leverage strategic partnerships to expand reach and impact.

Goal Type: Grow, expand, scale or increase access to the existing programs and services.


Goal Two: We are also focused on influence campus policies to better support student well-being; and target young people on either side of higher education, including high school and young professional life.

Goal Type: Grow, expand, scale or increase access to the existing programs and services.


Goal Three: Our org-wide goals are to broaden and deepen programmatic impact; maximize and increase funding sources; strengthen leadership bodies; and exponentially increase Active Minds’ brand recognition.

Goal Type: This goal reflects our commitment to further our advocacy work for our organization and or cause area.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Leadership Development

The nonprofit provides evidence of investment in leadership development


Describe an investment in leadership

Of our many goals to invest in leadership development, we assess ed the necessity of implementing parameters around chair leadership and evaluated current board committees to determine if any changes should be made. We were successful in the last 4 years in many of our goals including hiring a Chief Operating Officer; strengthening the Development Department to most successfully harness the organizations fundraising opportunities. We have accessed the membership, and selection process, of our Advisory Committees; determined current use of the Advisory Committees and proposed additional uses; and engaged Advisory Committee members in content development, programming, and fundraising.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Mobilizing for Mission

The nonprofit provides evidence of leadership through focusing externally and mobilizing resources for the mission.


This organization mobilizes for mission in the following ways:
  • Strategic Partnerships

  • Networks of Collective Impact Efforts

  • Thought Leadership

  • Raising Awareness

  • Community Building

  • Policy Advocacy

What are this organization’s external mobilizaton efforts?

We created virtual spaces where our community could gather safely to learn to support their own needs and those of their community. Most notably, we expanded our support of students of color, who are disproportionately impacted by the pandemic and the heightened awareness of systemic racism, through trainings and support of our students to lead programs to reach students of color, webinars and blog posts that elevate the voices of students of color, and our innovative Your Voice is Your Power campaign. We developed a new online version of our acclaimed Send Silence Packing exhibit, both as a stand-alone educational resource and as an enhancement of our in-person display. We effectively supported this digital pivot through content development, increasing production value, marketing, and speaker support. Additionally, our team is growing in exciting ways, including adding a new team to promote mental health in K-12 schools and a new Senior Manager of Health Equity.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Story of Adaptability

The nonprofit has an opportunity to tell the story of how the organization adapted to tremendous external changes in the last year.


In the 18 months since COVID-19 disrupted life as we knew it, Active Minds stayed strong and focused, evolving to provide the tools needed to enhance young adult wellness. We innovated, reimagined, and we led. We created virtual spaces where our community could gather safely to learn to support their own needs and those of their community. Our network of advocates ensured that even in online and virtual settings, the message that it’s okay to not be okay was heard. Most notably, we expanded our support of students of color, who are disproportionately impacted by the pandemic and the heightened awareness of systemic racism, through trainings and support of our students to lead programs to reach students of color, webinars and blog posts that elevate the voices of students of color, and our innovative Your Voice is Your Power campaign. We developed a new online version of our acclaimed Send Silence Packing exhibit, both as a stand-alone educational resource and as an enhancement of our in-person display. And after seeing incredible interest in virtual events from our Speakers (increasingly in workplaces, too), we effectively supported this digital pivot through content development, increasing production value, marketing, and speaker support. We held a virtual National Conference for the first time in our history, took first steps to pursue long-term goals of supporting young adults to advocate on local, state, and federal levels, and are developing a research-based curriculum for our chapters to increase the consistency and quality of their discussions across our network. Additionally, our team is growing in exciting ways, including adding a new team to promote mental health in K-12 schools and a new Senior Manager of Health Equity, to help drive on programmatic goals within Active Minds’ Anti-Racism and Inclusion Plan. Through these innovations, Active Minds will continue to keep the country’s attention on the very important mental health culture changes underway.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

...   Culture & Community


This score provides an assessment of the organization's engagement with the constituents it serves, a practice we term Constituent Feedback. When organizations listen to constituents, they are able to better deliver on programs and meet the needs of stakeholders. A future version of this Beacon will also assess an organization's people operations and its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) metrics.


Culture & Community Score

Not Currently Scored

Active Minds is currently not eligible for a Culture & Community score because we have not received its Constituent Feedback data. Nonprofit organizations are encouraged to fill out the How We Listen section of their Candid profile. This data will provide the basis for the initial evaluation of Culture & Community.

Note: The absence of a score does not indicate a positive or negative assessment, it only indicates that we have not yet evaluated the organization.


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Culture & Community Report

Unscored

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Constituent Feedback

Constituent Feedback

Not Scored


This organization reported that it is collecting feedback.


Here's how this organization is listening and learning from the people they serve:


How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees


How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve


With whom does your organization share the feedback you got from the people you serve?

Our staff, Our board, Our funders


What challenges does your organization face in collecting feedback from the people you serve?

We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback


Briefly describe a recent change that your organization made in response to feedback from the people you serve.

Note: The organization did not respond to this question.



Methodology


Charity Navigator believes nonprofit organizations that engage in inclusive practices, such as collecting feedback from the people and communities they serve, may be more effective. We've partnered with GuideStar by Candid to survey organizations about their feedback practices. Nonprofit organizations can fill out the How We Listen section of their Candid profile to receive a rating.


Charity Navigator awards full credit for this Beacon to every nonprofit that is eligible for an Encompass Rating that completes the survey, in recognition of their willingness to publicly share this information with the nonprofit and philanthropic communities. This data is not evaluated for quality at this time. Validation will be added in future iterations of this Beacon.

Analysis and Research


Like the overall Encompass Rating System, the Culture & Community Beacon is designed to evolve as metrics are developed and ready for integration. Our partnership with Feedback Labs and Guidestar by Candid, and other partners including Fund for Shared Insight, GlobalGiving, and Keystone Accountability, enables us to launch the first version of this beacon with Constituent Feedback information collected on Candid's site.


Feedback practices have been shown to support better Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion outcomes, an essential area of assessment that we intend to further expand and develop in the future. Feedback Labs has documented several studies which indicate that beyond achieving organizational goals, nonprofits that are attentive and responsive to concerns and ideas raised by beneficiaries establish stronger relationships with the people they serve, promote greater equity, and empower constituents in ways that can help to ensure better long-term outcomes. You can find resources to help nonprofits improve their feedback practices here.

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