Mission: Homeward Bound of Marin embraces a mission of 'opening doors to safety, dignity, hope and independence' to pursue its goal of "ending homelessness with training, hou ... (More)

Homeward Bound of Marin is a 501(c)(3) organization, with an IRS ruling year of 1984, and donations are tax-deductible.

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Contact Information

  https://hbofm.org/

 1385 North Hamilton Parkway
Novato CA 94949 

  415-382-3363


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Star Rating System by Charity Navigator


Charity Navigator evaluates a nonprofit organization’s financial health including measures of stability, efficiency and sustainability. We also track accountability and transparency policies to ensure the good governance and integrity of the organization.




Exceptional

This charity's score is 95.06, earning it a 4-Star rating. Donors can "Give with Confidence" to this charity. 

This score is calculated from two sub-scores:

This score represents Form 990 data from 2019, the latest year published by the IRS.

View this organization’s historical ratings.


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Star Rated Report

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Program Expense

Program Expense Ratio

88.8%


The Program Expense Ratio is determined by Program Expenses divided by Total Expense (average of most recent three 990s).


This measure reflects the percent of its total expenses a charity spends on the programs and services it exists to deliver. Dividing a charity's average program expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Administrative Expenses

7.2%


As reported by charities on their IRS Form 990, this measure reflects what percent of its total budget a charity spends on overhead, administrative staff and associated costs, and organizational meetings. Dividing a charity's average administrative expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Fundraising Expenses

3.9%


This measure reflects what a charity spends to raise money. Fundraising expenses can include campaign printing, publicity, mailing, and staffing and costs incurred in soliciting donations, memberships, and grants. Dividing a charity's average fundraising expenses by its average total functional expenses yields this percentage. We calculate the charity's average expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Liabilities to Assets Ratio

18.6%


The Liabilities to Assets Ratio is determined by Total Liabilities divided by Total Assets (most recent 990).


Part of our goal in rating the financial performance of charities is to help donors assess the financial capacity and sustainability of a charity. As do organizations in other sectors, charities must be mindful of their management of total liabilites in relation to their total assets. This ratio is an indicator of an organization’s solvency and or long term sustainability. Dividing a charity's total liabilities by its total assets yields this percentage.


Source: IRS Form 990

Fundraising Efficiency

$0.04


The amount spent to raise $1 in charitable contributions. To calculate a charity's fundraising efficiency, we divide its average fundraising expenses by the average total contributions it receives. We calculate the charity's average expenses and average contributions over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Working Capital Ratio

1.90 years


Determines how long a charity could sustain its level of spending using its net available assets, or working capital, as reported on its most recently filed Form 990. We include in a charity's working capital unrestricted and temporarily restricted net assets, and exclude permanently restricted net assets. Dividing these net available assets in the most recent year by a charity's average total expenses, yields the working capital ratio. We calculate the charity's average total expenses over its three most recent fiscal years.


Source: IRS Form 990

Program Expense Growth

5.52%


We compute the average annual growth of program expenses using the following formula: [(Yn/Y0)(1/n)]-1, where Y0 is a charity's program expenses in the first year of the interval analyzed, Yn is the charity's program expenses in the most recent year, and n is the interval of years passed between Y0 and Yn.


Source: IRS Form 990

Governance


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990 that the organization has these governance practices in place.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990

Governance:
Independent Voting Board Members  ... (More)
No Material Diversion of Assets ... (More)

A diversion of assets – any unauthorized conversion or use of the organization's assets other than for the organization's authorized purposes, including but not limited to embezzlement or theft – can seriously call into question a charity's financial integrity. We check the charity's last two Forms 990 to see if the charity has reported any diversion of assets. If the charity does report a diversion, then we check to see if it complied with the Form 990 instructions by describing what happened and its corrective action. This metric will be assigned to one of the following categories:

  • Full Credit: There has been no diversion of assets within the last two years.

  • Partial Credit: There has been a diversion of assets within the last two years and the charity has used Schedule O on the Form 990 to explain: the nature of the diversion, the amount of money or property involved and the corrective action taken to address the matter. In this situation, we deduct 7 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
  • No Credit: There has been a diversion of assets within the last two years and the charity's explanation on Schedule O is either non-existent or not sufficient. In this case, we deduct 15 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
(Less)
Audited Financials Prepared by Independent Accountant ... (More)

Audited financial statements provide important information about financial accountability and accuracy. They should be prepared by an independent accountant with oversight from an audit committee. (It is not necessary that the audit committee be a separate committee. Often at smaller charities, it falls within the responsibilities of the finance committee or the executive committee.) The committee provides an important oversight layer between the management of the organization, which is responsible for the financial information reported, and the independent accountant, who reviews the financials and issues an opinion based on its findings. We check the charity's Form 990 reporting to see if it meets this criteria.

  • Full Credit: The charity's audited financials were prepared by an independent accountant with an audit oversight committee.

  • Partial Credit: The charity's audited financials were prepared by an independent accountant, but it did not have an audit oversight committee. In this case, we deduct 7 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
  • No Credit: The charity did not have its audited financials prepared by an independent accountant. In this case, we deduct 15 points from the charity's Accountability and Transparency score.
(Less)
Does Not Provide Loan(s) to or Receive Loan(s) From Related Parties ... (More)
Documents Board Meeting Minutes ... (More)
Distributes 990 to Board Before Filing ... (More)
Compensates Board ... (More)

Policies


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990, or for some metrics on the charity's website, that the organization has these policies in place.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990 and organization's website

Policies:
Conflict of Interest  ... (More)
Whistleblower ... (More)
Records Retention and Destruction ... (More)
CEO Compensation Process ... (More)
Donor Privacy ... (More)

Donors have expressed extreme concern about the use of their personal information by charities and the desire to have this information kept confidential. The exchanging and sale of lists for telemarketing and the mass distribution of "junk mail," among other things, can be minimized if the charity assures the privacy of its donors. Privacy policies are assigned to one of the following categories:

  • Yes: This charity has a written donor privacy policy published on its website, which states unambiguously that (1) it will not share or sell a donor's personal information with anyone else, nor send donor mailings on behalf of other organizations or (2) it will only share or sell personal information once the donor has given the charity specific permission to do so.

  • Opt-out: The charity has a written privacy policy published on its website which enables donors to tell the charity to remove their names and contact information from lists the charity shares or sells. How a donor can have themselves removed from a list differs from one charity to the next, but any and all opt-out policies require donors to take specific action to protect their privacy.
  • No: This charity either does not have a written donor privacy policy in place to protect their contributors' personal information, or the existing policy does not meet our criteria.

The privacy policy must be specific to donor information. A general website policy which references "visitor" or "user" personal information will not suffice. A policy that refers to donor information collected on the website is also not sufficient as the policy must be comprehensive and applicable to both online and offline donors. The existence of a privacy policy of any type does not prohibit the charity itself from contacting the donor for informational, educational, or solicitation purposes.

(Less)

Transparency


Charity Navigator looks to confirm on the Form 990, or for some metrics on the charity's website, that the organization makes this information easily accessible.


Sources Include: IRS Form 990 and organization's website

Transparency:
CEO Salary Listed on 990 ... (More)
Board of Directors Listed on Website ... (More)
Key Staff Listed on Website ... (More)
Audited Financial Statements on Website ... (More)
Form 990 Available on Website ... (More)

Additional Information

Unscored

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Total Revenue and Expenses

Total Revenue and Expenses

This chart displays the trend of revenue and expenses over the past several years for this organization, as reported on their IRS Form 990.

Salary of Key Persons

Presented here are this organizations key compensated staff members as identified by our analysts. This compensation data includes salary, cash bonuses and expense accounts and is displayed exactly how it is reported to the IRS. The amounts do not include nontaxable benefits, deferred compensation, or other amounts not reported on W-2. In some cases, these amounts may include compensation from related organizations. Read the IRS policies for compensation reporting



Mary Kay Sweeney, Executive Director

$169,200 (1.95% of Total Expenses)


Source: IRS Form 990 (page 7), filing year 2020

Business Master File Data

Below are some key data points from the Exempt Organization IRS Business Master File (BMF) for this organization. Learn more about the BMF on the IRS website


Activities:

Supplying money, goods or services to the poor (BMF activity code: 560)


Foundation Status:

Organization which receives a substantial part of its support from a governmental unit or the general public   170(b)(1)(A)(vi) (BMF foundation code: 15)


Affiliation:

Independent - the organization is an independent organization or an independent auxiliary (i.e., not affiliated with a National, Regional, or Geographic grouping of organizations). (BMF affiliation code: 3)

Data Sources: IRS Forms 990

The Form 990 is a document that nonprofit organizations file with the IRS annually. We leverage finance and accountability data from it to form Encompass ratings. Click here to view this organization's Forms 990 on the IRS website (if any are available).

Pandemic Response

Due to the unprecedented nature of the pandemic, we give charities such as this one the opportunity to share the story of COVID's impact on them. Charities may submit their own pandemic responses through their nonprofit portal.


Homeward Bound of Marin reported being impacted by COVID-19 in the following ways:
  • Program Delivery

  • Fundraising Capacity

  • Revenue

  • Staffing

  • Administrative Capacity

  • Balance Sheet


How COVID-19 impacted the organization's operations financially:

Homeward Bound of Marin faced revenue losses while filling pressing needs for food, supplies and services. Homeward Bound received a Paycheck Protection Program forgivable loan in spring 2020, keeping programs open while covering higher staff and overtime needs. Costs mounted for purchase of cleaning supplies and personal protective equipment for residents and staff. We hired janitorial services to augment cleaning. Our culinary staff made up to 10,000 meals monthly for people in shelters and housing, along with at-risk seniors in our community. We delivered up to 40 pantry boxes weekly for residents in affordable housing programs. We canceled all 2020 fundraising events and lost revenue from The Key Room - our event venue and main social enterprise, which generates up to $500,000 yearly. The addition of meal services partly funded by FEMA allowed us to continue hunger relief and keep culinary trainees employed. Our venue remains closed and serves as a staging area for hunger relief.


How COVID-19 impacted the organization's delivery of programs:

The pandemic deeply affected our shelters, supportive housing, culinary training and social enterprises. Preventing COVID-19 became paramount for communal programs serving individuals with serious health conditions and a growing number of seniors. In the 2020-21 fiscal year, 27% of those served were over 62 years old. As economic fallout hit families and individuals in our housing, we began delivery of weekly grocery boxes and hygiene supplies. A county directive to temporarily halt intake of shelter clients combined with unprecedented efforts to find housing options cut the numbers of people in close proximity in our shelters. Safety concerns paused community activities for shelters and housing. We paused recruiting for Fresh Starts Culinary Academy. Two social enterprise businesses -- The Key Room event venue and Fresh Starts Chef Events celebrity chef dinners -- suffered major disruption. This led to loss of employment for culinary students and graduates building workplace skills.


How this organization adapted to changing conditions caused by COVID-19:

Working with health officials, we revamped spaces for social distancing, added hand-washing stations, staggered mealtimes and wrote guidelines to refer anyone with troubling symptoms to a motel room. Homeward Bound staff worked remotely when possible. Meetings occurred via phone or Zoom. For Project Roomkey, our staff stretched to serve families and adults sheltering in motels, including delivery of meals, sanitizer and referrals to resources. Housing sites created door-to-door food pantries and doorstep social events. When Project Homekey allowed the county to buy an office building, we established a temporary shelter there. The culinary staff made meals for seniors in the community under the state's Great Plates Delivered program. Fresh Starts Culinary Academy created advanced curriculum for graduates working in our kitchens to cover advanced knife skills and kitchen administration. The training staff helped graduates who lost employment to secure aid and apply for new jobs.


Innovations the organization intends to continue permanently after the pandemic:

A hybrid work option will remain in place for people who can do their jobs from home. Our enhanced skills for virtual events create the possibility of engaging donors and volunteers with virtual activities in the future. The extended training created during the pandemic for culinary graduates fulfilling transitional employment provided new learning opportunities that can be incorporated going forward.


Historical Ratings

Date PublishedForm 990 FYEOverall ScoreOverall Rating
Rating Version: 2.1
11/1/20202019 95.06
7/1/20192018 95.70
2/1/20192017 96.45
8/1/20172016 93.56
7/1/20162015 91.50
6/1/20162014 90.73
Rating Version: 2.0
3/1/20162014 91.72
7/1/20152014 91.72

This organization received multiple star ratings within this fiscal year, due to an update to it's Accountability and Transparency data and/or the receipt of an amended Form 990.

10/1/20142013 88.90
11/1/20132012 91.47
3/1/20132011 91.92
11/6/20122011 83.41
10/1/20122011 80.73
12/1/20112010 94.27
9/20/20112009 88.48
Rating Version: 1.0
10/1/20102009 88.99
4/1/20102008 82.80
9/1/20092007 85.79
12/15/20072006 89.37
12/1/20062005 82.75
11/1/20052004 85.37
1/5/20052003 90.04

...   Impact & Results


This score estimates the actual impact a nonprofit has on the lives of those it serves, and determines whether it is making good use of donor resources to achieve that impact.


Impact & Results Score

100

out of 100

Homeward Bound of Marin is , earning a passing score.


Impact

$50 provides a night of shelter for a person experiencing homelessness.


Do you work at Homeward Bound of Marin? Join the waitlist for an updated Impact & Results score.


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Impact & Results Report

100

of 100 points


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Rated Program

Rated Program


Program

Family Center, Mill Street Center, New Beginnings Center, Transition to Wellness and Voyager

Activities

The nonprofit provides people experiencing homelessness with a temporary place to stay.

Program Type

Beneficiaries Served

Program Geography

Time Period of Data


Learn how we assess the impact of nonprofits

Outcomes and Cost

Outcomes: Changes in the lives of those served by a nonprofit. They can be caused by the nonprofit.

Costs: The money spent by a nonprofit and its partners and beneficiaries.

Impact: Outcome caused by a nonprofit relative to its cost.

Cost-effectiveness: A judgment as to whether the cost was a good use of resources to cause the outcome.


Outcome Metric


Outcome Data Source

Ratings are based on data the nonprofit itself collects on its work. We use the most recent year with sufficient data. Typically, this data allows us to calculate direct changes in participants' lives, such as increased income.


We look for self-reported shelter nights. If we cannot find this information we estimate it using HIC data.


Method for Attributing Outcomes

We don't know if the observed changes were caused by the nonprofit's program or something else happening at the same time (e.g., a participant got a raise). To determine causation, we take the outcomes we observe and subtract an estimate of the outcomes that would have happened even without the program (i.e., counterfactual outcomes).


We assume that the provision of shelter by one nonprofit does not diminish the provision of shelter by any other (neighboring) nonprofit. We also assume there is, in general, no slack capacity in the homeless shelter system. In the absence of a given shelter, beneficiaries would not be able to stay at another shelter because other shelters are assumed to have no beds to spare. We therefore set the counterfactual to zero.


Cost Data Source

After estimating the program's outcomes, we need to determine how much it cost to achieve those outcomes. All monetary costs are counted, whether they are borne by a nonprofit service deliverer or by the nonprofit’s public and private partners.


Program cost data reported by the nonprofit. Partner and beneficiary costs reported by the nonprofit or estimated by Charity Navigator.


Impact and Determination

We calculate impact, defined as the change in outcomes attributable to a program divided by the cost to achieve those outcomes.

Impact Statement

$50 provides a night of shelter for a person experiencing homelessness.

Benchmark for Rating

Impact & Results scores of emergency shelters are based on the cost of providing a night of shelter relative to the Fair Market Rent in that county. Programs receive an Impact & Results score of 100 if they are less than 200% the Fair Market Rent and a score of 75 if they are less than 400%. If a nonprofit reports impact but doesn't meet the threshold for cost-effectiveness, it earns a score of 50.

Determination

Nonprofit Comment

Before publishing, we ask every nonprofit we can to review our work, offer corrections and provide a comment.


This nonprofit did not provide a comment

Analysis Details


Analysis conducted by ImpactMatters and published on November 22, 2019.

Additional Information

Unscored

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Largest Programs

Largest Programs



Homeward Bound of Marin reported its three largest programs on its FY 2020 Form 990 as:


$4,679,659

Spent in most recent FY

52%

Percent of program expenses


Adult Services Program - Homeward Bound serves single adults experiencing homelessness through residential programs that range from the only year-round emergency shelters in Marin County to permanent  ... (More)


$1,594,109

Spent in most recent FY

17%

Percent of program expenses


Family Services Program - Since 1974, Homeward Bound has operated the only year-round emergency shelter for homeless families in Marin County, California, along with eight transitional and permanent s ... (More)


$1,546,942

Spent in most recent FY

17%

Percent of program expenses


Mental Health Services - Homeward Bound provides emergency shelter and permanent supportive housing for adults suffering from persistent mental illness. These programs have been designed to enhance in ... (More)


...   Leadership & Adaptability


This score provides an assessment of the organization's leadership capacity, strategic thinking and planning, and ability to innovate or respond to changes in constituent demand/need or other relevant social and economic conditions to achieve the organization's mission.


Leadership & Adaptability Score

100

out of 100

The score earned by Homeward Bound of Marin is a passing score.

Encompass Rating V4 provides an evaluation of the organization's Leadership & Adaptability through the nonprofit organization submitting a survey response directly to Charity Navigator.


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Leadership & Adaptability Report

100

of 100 points

Mission

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking through articulating the organization’s mission


Homeward Bound of Marin embraces a mission of 'opening doors to safety, dignity, hope and independence' and pursues the goal of 'ending homelessness with training, housing and hope.' Homeward Bound is Marin County's chief provider of shelter and supportive housing for homeless families and individuals, with 18 programs serving approximately 1,000 people per year. Robust services offer an array of support to each individual forging a path out of homelessness. Programs ranging from emergency shelter to transitional and permanent housing have built a record of success in a hyper-expensive rental market. During the pandemic, programs stretched to serve emergency motel shelters and opened paths to stable housing for a total of 187 people leaving our programs in the 2020-21 fiscal year.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Vision

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking through articulating the organization’s vision.


Homeward Bound of Marin focuses on the vision that “everybody needs a place to call home.” A community that embraces this vision can create practices that make homelessness a rare, brief experience that will be met with effective solutions. Homeward Bound will continue to evolve and craft the solutions that can bring this vision to reality.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Strategic Goals

The nonprofit organization presents evidence of strategic thinking and goal setting through sharing their most important strategic goals.


Goal One: Homeward Bound aims to end veteran homelessness in Marin County by building 24 apartments for former servicemembers. The space accommodates all the unhoused veterans identified in the county.

Goal Type: Grow, expand, scale or increase access to the existing programs and services.


Goal Two: We will complete a rebuilt shelter with 32 new units of supportive housing in 2022. This site will offer more paths to stability and health for people with a prolonged history of homelessness.

Goal Type: Grow, expand, scale or increase access to the existing programs and services.


Goal Three: We will grow social enterprises to offer work experience, career paths and revenue to support our programs. This involves refined business models, capital improvements and skills growth for the team.

Goal Type: Grow, expand, scale or increase access to the existing programs and services.


Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Leadership Development

The nonprofit provides evidence of investment in leadership development


Describe an investment in leadership

Leadership development at Homeward Bound has supported growth of services and effectiveness by preparing key staff members to take on increased responsibility or expand their roles. These may involve areas like social enterprise management, program development with community partners or activities with a discrete team like our Safety Committee. In the past 18 months, leadership development has coupled with the embrace of Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion principles throughout the organization. The Leadership Team and other key staff members have been trained to conduct workshops around JEDI topics and the full staff has participated in listening sessions plus small-group conversations.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Mobilizing for Mission

The nonprofit provides evidence of leadership through focusing externally and mobilizing resources for the mission.


This organization mobilizes for mission in the following ways:
  • Strategic Partnerships

  • Networks of Collective Impact Efforts

  • Thought Leadership

  • Raising Awareness

What are this organization’s external mobilizaton efforts?

Homeward Bound of Marin engages with government, nonprofit and corporate entities that share the goal to end homelessness. They include three hospitals supporting an innovative medical respite program that improves health and saved $3.3 million last year in avoided hospital days. We join local leaders in the 'coordinated entry' process that assesses needs and housing options for unhoused people in our community. We participate in affiliate networks like Catalyst Kitchens for employment social enterprise and Built for Zero, which gathers communities nationwide to build data-informed systems that reduce homelessness. Homeward Bound shares its work through Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, sends monthly email news and mails a biannual report to 5,000+ supporters. Executive staff speak frequently to congregations, service clubs, and community groups. We offer avenues for neighbors to build community spirit and support our programs with volunteer activities.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

Story of Adaptability

The nonprofit has an opportunity to tell the story of how the organization adapted to tremendous external changes in the last year.


The onset of COVID-19 required immediate response across the breadth of our services. This external change fueled the majority of our adaptations in the past year. Social distancing, masking and hand-washing, sanitation supplies and changes to food service all played a role in keeping our shelters from experiencing an outbreak of COVID-19. Our team responded to a need for services at family motel shelters by stretching to assist an additional 23 families. Pandemic-induced complications in the supply chain and related price increases for building materials required Homeward Bound to renew fundraising efforts for our new shelter and supportive housing program that began construction in January. Also spurred by the pandemic, Project Homekey allowed Homeward Bound an unforeseen opportunity to respond to the housing crisis by partnering with the County of Marin to create 18 supportive housing units in a former motel in Corte Madera.

Source: Nonprofit submitted responses

...   Culture & Community


This score provides an assessment of the organization's engagement with the constituents it serves, a practice we term Constituent Feedback. When organizations listen to constituents, they are able to better deliver on programs and meet the needs of stakeholders. A future version of this Beacon will also assess an organization's people operations and its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) metrics.


Culture & Community Score

Not Currently Scored

Homeward Bound of Marin is currently not eligible for a Culture & Community score because we have not received its Constituent Feedback data. Nonprofit organizations are encouraged to fill out the How We Listen section of their Candid profile. This data will provide the basis for the initial evaluation of Culture & Community.

Note: The absence of a score does not indicate a positive or negative assessment, it only indicates that we have not yet evaluated the organization.


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Culture & Community Report

Unscored

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Constituent Feedback

Constituent Feedback


Constituent Feedback and Listening Practice data are not available for this organization. Nonprofit organizations are encouraged to fill out the How We Listen section of their Candid profile. This data will provide the basis for the initial evaluation of Culture & Community.


Charity Navigator believes nonprofit organizations that engage in inclusive practices, such as collecting feedback from the people and communities they serve, may be more effective. We award every nonprofit that completes the Candid survey full credit for this Beacon, in recognition of their willingness to publicly share this information with the nonprofit and philanthropic communities. Although the data is not evaluated for quality at this time, future iterations of this Beacon will include third party or other data that will serve to validate the information provided by the nonprofit.

Analysis and Research


Like the overall Encompass Rating System, the Culture & Community Beacon is designed to evolve as metrics are developed and ready for integration. Our partnership with Feedback Labs and Guidestar by Candid, and other partners including Fund for Shared Insight, GlobalGiving, and Keystone Accountability, enables us to launch the first version of this beacon with Constituent Feedback information collected on Candid's site.


Feedback practices have been shown to support better Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion outcomes, an essential area of assessment that we intend to further expand and develop in the future. Feedback Labs has documented several studies which indicate that beyond achieving organizational goals, nonprofits that are attentive and responsive to concerns and ideas raised by beneficiaries establish stronger relationships with the people they serve, promote greater equity, and empower constituents in ways that can help to ensure better long-term outcomes. You can find resources to help nonprofits improve their feedback practices here.

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